JournoGeekery


  1. techspotlight:

Is Apple making Google nervous? It seemed that way at a Google Maps press event held in San Francisco today, where the search giant, which has over a billion monthly active users for its maps products and has long dominated the maps market on mobile devices, showed off new Google Maps features just days ahead of Apple’s annual Worldwide Developers Conference on Monday. Along with other things, Apple is expected to unveil its own 3-D mapping product at that event, supplanting Google Maps on the iPhone. Google’s scheduling of its own event the week before allowed it to highlight upcoming features—such as vastly improved 3-D modeling—it but also made it seem like the company is uneasy about what may be coming next. At the event, Peter Birch, product manager for Google Earth, showed off new techniques for making 3-D maps, which includes equipping a fleet of planes with custom Google-designed cameras to capture shots from various directions that can then be used to create accurate building and terrain models. Birch said the planes are flown in a tightly controlled pattern to ensure sufficient overlap in the images and represent large metropolitan areas. He said Google uses a technique called stereo photogrammetry to extract models from the numerous images that are collected. (via Google Demos New Maps Features Ahead of Apple Announcement - Technology Review)

    techspotlight:

    Is Apple making Google nervous? It seemed that way at a Google Maps press event held in San Francisco today, where the search giant, which has over a billion monthly active users for its maps products and has long dominated the maps market on mobile devices, showed off new Google Maps features just days ahead of Apple’s annual Worldwide Developers Conference on Monday. Along with other things, Apple is expected to unveil its own 3-D mapping product at that event, supplanting Google Maps on the iPhone. Google’s scheduling of its own event the week before allowed it to highlight upcoming features—such as vastly improved 3-D modeling—it but also made it seem like the company is uneasy about what may be coming next. At the event, Peter Birch, product manager for Google Earth, showed off new techniques for making 3-D maps, which includes equipping a fleet of planes with custom Google-designed cameras to capture shots from various directions that can then be used to create accurate building and terrain models. Birch said the planes are flown in a tightly controlled pattern to ensure sufficient overlap in the images and represent large metropolitan areas. He said Google uses a technique called stereo photogrammetry to extract models from the numerous images that are collected. (via Google Demos New Maps Features Ahead of Apple Announcement - Technology Review)